Dave and Chuck the Freak

Taylor Swift attends the red carpet during the MTV Europe Music Awards 2022 held at PSD Bank Dome on November 13, 2022 in Duesseldorf, Germany.

Ticketmaster has canceled tomorrow’s (November 18) on-sale for Taylor Swift’s highly-anticipated, expanded The Eras tour. Last Friday, Swift announced 17 additional dates to the tour, bringing the total number of U.S. shows to 52. This makes it her biggest tour to date.

However, Ticketmaster took to their official Twitter account and broke the bad news to Swifties looking to secure a ticket. They wrote: “Due to extraordinarily high demands on ticketing systems and insufficient remaining ticket inventory to meet that demand, tomorrow’s public on-sale for Taylor Swift | The Eras Tour has been canceled.”

Outraged fans called out the tickets sales site on Twitter, with one user quoting Swift’s lyrics, “It’s me, hi, I’m the problem, it’s me” and tagged Ticketmaster.

Another fan called out the company writing, “There were a lot of REAL fans that were screwed & this is all your fault @Ticketmaster. Meanwhile there are thousands of tickets being re-sold for WAYYYY more than face value. Amounts that are not realistic for a lot of people to even purchase. You guys messed this up big time.”

The sudden cancellation comes after Ticketmaster said that more than 2 million tickets were sold on Tuesday — the most ever sold for an artist in a single day, causing a near meltdown of its website, according to CNN. In a blog post today titled “The Taylor Swift Onsale Explained,” Ticketmaster said that its “Verified Fans” system, a mechanism aimed at eliminating bots that gives presale codes to individuals, couldn’t keep up with the intense demand. Roughly 3.5 million people signed up for the program to buy Swift tickets, its “largest registration in history.” That unprecedented demand, combined with a “staggering number of bot attacks as well as fans who didn’t have invite codes” drove “unprecedented traffic” to its site and broke it.

Another user on Twitter, who claimed they were a “Verified Fan” wrote, “Seriously? I tried the verified fan route and that didn’t work. Was planning on buying tickets tomorrow. What the hell? Swifties, rise up in protest!”

“Never before has a Verified Fan on sale sparked so much attention – or uninvited volume,” Ticketmaster added in the blog post. “This disrupted the predictability and reliability that is the hallmark of our Verified Fan platform.”